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There is a lot riding on this new, stretch SUV considering the role Nissan/Infiniti has played in revolutionizing the SUV market. Their stylish Nissan Murano set a style trend in SUVs that’s been obvious in every major brand for the last decade. The upscale model, the muscular-looking, five-passenger, Infiniti FX -50 can go head to head in terms of ride, looks, and interior appointments with any brand.

In addition, the FX models always had heavy duty power plants enabling them to run with or ahead of the competition just as Infiniti’s sport coups, the G and IPL, readily ran with their contemporary BMWs and Audis. While one doesn’t expect a truck to be quite as versatile and maneuverable as an SUV, the JX – the company’s first venture into the seven-passenger market – was still expected to dazzle.

But it doesn’t, though not for lack of trying.

The New York Times’ Lawrence Ulrich absolutely hated this car ( http://www.nytimes.com/2012/06/10/a...-those-seats-the-driver-is-left-out.html?_r=1 ). But having high hopes dashed and the automotive equivalent of a broken heart needn’t generate such hostility.

In its national advertising, Infiniti touts the JX’ electronic safety systems in this $52,000 SUV, including one which detects objects behind the car while it is moving in reverse, and automatically applies the brakes. In the ads, the smart-car stops the JX before it hits a child pushing his toy car. As with any new technology, it needs a little work. When I tried this in my driveway, the JX smart system stopped the car before it backed into my wife’s Honda. But the system went dumb when it came to the two-foot high, child-sized birdbath – much to the annoyance of an assortment of sparrows, chickadees, and cardinals out for an afternoon splash.

There are a host of electronic gadgets, however. Their lane warning system, detects when you are veering outside the dotted lines, even if they are covered by several inches of fast-moving rainwater. The sight lines aren’t the best, but the car’s blind-spot warning system alerts drivers to cars they can’t see. There is also “intelligent” cruise control, which senses slower cars ahead and adjusts the speed to maintain a safe distance behind the vehicle until it speeds up or moves out of the way.



Infiniti has also borrowed a page from GM’s OnStar system, and is offering its own, live, “Personal Assistant”. In addition to automatically notifying nearby emergency personnel in the event of a crash, or immobilizing a stolen car, the Assistant can make hotel or restaurant reservations or provide step-by-step directions, among other services.

Under the Infiniti’s hood is a 3.5-liter V-6 engine providing 265 horsepower and 248 pound feet of torque. That is significantly less power than the Audi Q-7, and not enough to stand out from the motorized crowd. It is, however, more than enough for an efficient, dependable SUV. That power was appreciated on a trip with the grand children to the New Jersey shore (Snookie was not invited).

The Atlantic Ocean beach at Seaside Heights was off limits to the little ones – and everyone else. There was a fierce storm far out to sea sending high waves crashing onshore – which meant the little ones could not play in the sand. In minutes, the streets of Seaside Heights were overwhelmed, with water covering the curbs and lawns and lapping against the summer rentals and year-round residences alike. None of it affected the JX, which rolled through fast moving, eight inches of water with aplomb – providing the kind of safe, secure ride one seeks in a large SUV.

Outside, the JX looks like what it is – a stretched SUV. In that stretching, however, it lost some of the distinctive flair which has characterized Infiniti vehicles. It’s pleasant to look at, but nothing special to make heads swivel. The JX has the Infiniti trademark look, with a trim silhouette tapering towards the rear. There is a single, sunroof over the front seats, and long, wide windows for the first and second rows, which actually opens. There is a smaller, viewing window next to the third row, but it does not move.

There was a thought among Infiniti’s designers that if you had a third row of seats, everyone should be able to actually use them. As a result, the JX provides about a yard of space between the first and second row of seats, but a bit less than a foot between the third and second row. The middle row, however, can slide 18 inches, which allows adjustments to fit most adults in all rows. That tapered roof does cut down on the headroom, though, and would prove annoying to folks pushing six feet in height.

In terms of amenities, the JX has heated leather seats as well as heated steering wheel, which can be appreciated in cold weather or when there are sore joints. There is faux wood grain paneling on the doors, dash, and center console, which looks almost real.

The Bose sound system with 13 speakers is superb and, more importantly, easy to use.

The navigation system has an eight-inch screen with a split view backup camera: one is looking behind the car, and the other provides a 360 view all around the car. It allows you to change the view so when you are backing up, you can actually look along the passenger side of the car to see how close to the curb you are. If you use it, it is more reliable than the robot-powered safety brakes.

There are thoughtful storage spaces in the JX. The arm rest in the center console is nine inches wide, and deep enough too hold a small pocketbook. There is also a nine-inch-deep storage bin under the trunk, which is pretty small if the third row is in use.

One would be hard pressed to get a couple of baby strollers and luggage in there, though the storage bin is handy for smaller items.

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